British Museum stocks ethical product range

British Museum stocks ethical product range

The British Museum in London opens a major exhibition tomorrow (27 October) entitled South Africa: The Art of a Nation.  In this exhibition, a diverse range of art from across the ages tells a story that stretches back 100,000 years.  Claire Shepherd, a South African living in Bassenthwaite (Cumbria), has secured an order for her firm, Zuza Trading, of more than 9,000 units from the British Museum to stock the exhibition gift shop.

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Ethical toys ‘born’ in South Africa look forward to meeting British babies

Ethical toys ‘born’ in South Africa look forward to meeting British babies

Here at Zuza Trading, we’re very excited to introduce you to our new range of gifts for babies. They are made of Shwe Shwe, a printed dyed cotton fabric widely used for traditional Sotho (South Africa and Lesotho) clothing. The fabric is manufactured in a variety of colours and printing designs characterised by intricate geometric patterns. Due to its timeless popularity, Shwe Shwe has been described as the denim (or tartan) of South Africa.

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Cosmo's Story

Cosmo Mafoti (click here to see his photo) is 40 year's old and hails from Zimbabwe.  He was born in Harare and started beading when he came to South Africa at the age of 25. Cosmo is married with 3 children .

Cosmo is part of a team that comprises of John, Spider-Man, No More and Tafadza, who all work from Avonmore Spar in Durban KZN South Africa.  This team of beaders all come from Zimbabwe. Cosmo heads up a thriving business that the locals and decor fraternity indulge in. The array of beaded work range from a selection of key rings, animals, hearts, lettering, lampshades and scooby wire items. Cosmo keeps up with the trends and also makes specific items depending on the season.

Cosmo has this ever lasting smile that just eludes passion for his beadwork and also has the willingness to try and please all his clients with whatever they are looking for.

Wendy's Story

Wendy is originally from the Cape Town area but left to go to the Eastern Cape for schooling before returning home again. She now lives with her three brothers and seven year old daughter. Wendy discovered she was HIV+ late in 2002 after she was diagnosed with TB. When she was at the hospital receiving treatment for TB the doctors suggested that she attend a clinic and voluntarily get tested, so she did. Finding out about her HIV status was the most difficult day of her life. She couldn't bring herself to tell anyone and held it inside. Eventually, she disclosed her status to her sister (who is also HIV+) and her aunt, who both showed support for her, but still does not feel comfortable disclosing to the rest of her family because she is worried they will not accept her. She knows that the most important thing is that she accepts it for herself and tries to lead a normal life. 

Wendy came to Wola Nani in 2003 in order to be part of the support groups and for the opportunity of receiving food parcels. Soon after, she joined the income generation programme making light bulbs. She laughs and says "I never stop working." She enjoys making the crafts for Wola Nani, as it gives her the opportunity to earn money to send her daughter to school and provide food for her family. She no longer has to rely on the monthly food parcels. Her motto to get through life, as well as advice to others, is to practice patience.